February Programs at the N.C. Museum of History


RALEIGH, NC Jan. 9, 2015 – During Black History Month, the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will feature three programs about experiences of African Americans. The Justice Theater Project will present the original and innovative work Voices That Challenge, which is told through dance, spoken word, and music. The presentation centers on the voices and leaders of Operation Breadbasket, an important effort during the Civil Rights movement, that was launched in 1962 to create economic opportunities in African American communities.

Another program focuses on the 1947 film “Pitch a Boogie Woogie,” featuring African American musicians and actors from Greenville, N.C. Hear about the significance and legacy of the film and its role in our state’s history. Watch clips of this movie that was thought lost until the 1970s.

February also brings seven children’s programs, ranging from sweet valentine treats to a lively retelling of a North Carolina folktale about Daniel Boone. There is something for all ages.

Take advantage of these and other programs in February at the N.C. Museum of History. Admission is free unless otherwise noted. Parking is free on weekends.

 

File 1950_94_25a: Love is in the air during the program Time for Tots: Have a Heart! on Feb. 3 at the N.C. Museum of History.

Love is in the air during the program Time for Tots: Have a Heart! on Feb. 3 at the N.C. Museum of History.

*Time for Tots: Have a Heart!

Tuesday, Feb. 3 or 10, 10-10:45 a.m.

Ages 3-5 (with adult)

$3 plus tax per child; $1 plus tax for museum members**

To register, visit NCMOH-programs.com. For information, call 919-807-7979.

Discover heart shapes in items from the museum’s collection. Then create a heart-shaped valentine for someone you love!

 

*History Corner: Sugar Shock!

Wednesday, Feb. 4, 10-11 a.m.

Ages 6-9 (with adult)

$3 plus tax per child; $1 plus tax for museum members

To register, visit NCMOH-programs.com. For information, call 919-807-7988.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, you’ll learn about historic sweet treats and taste one or two for yourself.

 

*History Hunters: Sweet History

Wednesday, Feb. 4, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Ages 10-13

$3 plus tax per child; $1 plus tax for museum members

To register, visit NCMOH-programs.com. For information, call 919-807-7988.

How did people sweeten their food in the past? How have our tastes changed over time? Find out, then make a sweet treat to take home.

 

*Storytime in the Gallery

Thursdays, Feb. 5, 12, 19 and 26

10-10:30 a.m.

Ages 3 and up (with adult)

Meet a staff member at the information desk and follow your guide to one of the museum galleries. There, you can look around and listen to a history-related story.

 

*First Friday at the Museum

Friday, Feb. 6, 5-9 p.m.

This month, enjoy some of the educational programs offered by the Museum of History as you explore its Education Center, provided by the State Employees’ Credit Union.

 

Image of a musician featured in “Pitch a Boogie Woogie,” a film that was thought lost until the 1970s. On Feb. 7 at the N.C. Museum of History, hear more about the film during the program Legacy of “Pitch a Boogie Woogie,” presented by Alex Albright from East Carolina University. Image credit: Patrick Keough and Alex Albright

Image of a musician featured in “Pitch a Boogie Woogie,” a film that was thought lost until the 1970s. On Feb. 7 at the N.C. Museum of History, hear more about the film during the program Legacy of “Pitch a Boogie Woogie,” presented by Alex Albright from East Carolina University. Image credit: Patrick Keough and Alex Albright

The Legacy of “Pitch a Boogie Woogie”

Saturday, Feb. 7, 2 p.m.

Alex Albright, East Carolina University

Shot in Greenville in 1947 using a local cast of African American musicians and actors, “Pitch a Boogie Woogie” was thought lost until the 1970s, when Albright found a copy and fought to restore it for future audiences. Albright will show the film and discuss its importance and legacy.

Hear Scott Ainslie during a free performance on Sunday, Feb. 8, at the N.C. Museum of History. Image credit: Nathan Ekis

Hear Scott Ainslie during a free performance on Sunday, Feb. 8, at the N.C. Museum of History. Image credit: Nathan Ekis

 

Music of the Carolinas: Scott Ainslie

Sunday, Feb. 8, 3 p.m.

Ainslie’s latest album, The Last Shot Got Him, features a 1934 Gibson archtop guitar and the blues songs and standards that were popular when the guitar was young. The performance is presented with PineCone and support from the N.C. Museum of History Associates and Williams Mullen.

After the concert, join Ainslie at a special meet-and-greet session. Buy tickets ($15 plus tax) for this reception at PineCone.org.

Derek Lindsley, Sport Analyst with the International Olympic Committee, will give an overview of  the summer and winter Olympic sports and more. Hear him during History à la Carte: The Olympics: Bringing Results to the World on Feb. 11 at the N.C. Museum of History.

Derek Lindsley, Sport Analyst with the International Olympic Committee, will give an overview of the summer and winter Olympic sports and more. Hear him during History à la Carte: The Olympics: Bringing Results to the World on Feb. 11 at the N.C. Museum of History.

 

History à la Carte: The Olympics: Bringing Results to the World

Wednesday, Feb. 11, noon-1 p.m.

Bring your lunch; beverages provided.

Derek Lindsley, Sport Analyst, Olympic Results and Information Services, International Olympic Committee

Get an overview of the summer and winter Olympic sports and an explanation of how timing and scoring systems work. Lindsley also will discuss the role of technology in the Olympic games.

 

Conservation Assistance Day

Friday, Feb. 13, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Appointment required. Call Jan Sweatt at 919-807-7823.

Do you have questions about caring for a treasured possession? Make an appointment and you may bring up to three objects to the museum for assessment and advice on care from a museum conservator.

 

Starring North Carolina! Film Series: “Firestarter”

Friday, Feb. 13, 6 p.m.

$5 plus tax per person; $4 plus tax for museum members

MPAA rating: R-L,V; run time: 114 min.

Jennifer Ward Bunch, Actress

Shot around Wilmington, including scenes at Orton Plantation and Oakland Plantation, and in Chimney Rock and Lake Lure, the making of this movie brought producer Dino De Laurentiis to the state and encouraged him to start taking actions that resulted in a revival of filmmaking in Wilmington. Bunch was cast as star Drew Barrymore’s body double for “Firestarter” and for “Cat’s Eye.”

 

African American History Tours

Saturdays, Feb. 14 and 28, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Explore the lives and accomplishments of African American North Carolinians from the colonial period to the civil rights era.

 

*Make It, Take It: Heart-y Greetings

Saturday, Feb. 14, 1-3 p.m. (drop-in program)

See some valentines of days past, and make a heartfelt card of your own.

 

Justice Theater Project: Voices That Challenge

Saturday, Feb. 14, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 15, 3 p.m.

$8 plus tax per adult; free, children 12 and under with adult

To purchase tickets, visit theJusticeTheaterProject.org.

For information, call 919-264-7089.

Using dance, spoken word, and music, the Justice Theater Project presents Voices That Challenge, an original work about the voices and leadership of Operation Breadbasket.

Voices That Challenge features Baba Chuck Davis and is a collaboration between the JTP; the Museum of History; the Panoramic Dance Project at N.C. State University; N.C. Central University; the Longleaf School of the Arts in Raleigh; and L. D. Burris, former dancer for Chuck Davis, with 2 Near the Edge of Durham.

Teen actors from Raleigh Little Theatre will present Storytellers to Go: Oh, Deer! on Feb. 21 at the N.C. Museum of History.

Teen actors from Raleigh Little Theatre will present Storytellers to Go: Oh, Deer! on Feb. 21 at the N.C. Museum of History.

 

*Storytellers to Go: Oh, Deer!

Saturday, Feb. 21, 2-3 p.m.

Performed by teen actors from Raleigh Little Theatre, this lively retelling of the North Carolina folktale explains how Daniel Boone met his “dear.”

Teen actors from Raleigh Little Theatre will present Storytellers to Go: Oh, Deer! on Feb. 21 at the N.C. Museum of History.

Teen actors from Raleigh Little Theatre will present Storytellers to Go: Oh, Deer! on Feb. 21 at the N.C. Museum of History.

 

For information about the N.C. Museum of History, a Smithsonian-affiliated museum, call 919-807-7900 or access ncmuseumofhistory.org or follow on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ or YouTube.

* Marks programs of interest to children or families

** Effective Jan. 1, 2015, local and state sales taxes apply to exhibit and program fees at the N.C. Museum of History. These new taxes on entertainment activity are in accordance with N.C. General Statute 05-164.4G.

 

About the N.C. Museum of History

The N.C. Museum of History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is located at 5 E. Edenton Street in downtown Raleigh. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The museum collects and preserves artifacts of North Carolina history and educates the public on the history of the state and the nation through exhibits and educational programs. Each year more than 300,000 people visit the museum to see some of the 150,000 artifacts in the museum collection. The Museum of History, within the Division of State History Museums, is part of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

About the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources (NCDCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s cultural resources to build the social, cultural and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan W. Kluttz, NCDCR’s mission to enrich lives and communities creates opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history and libraries in North Carolina that will spark creativity, stimulate learning, preserve the state’s history and promote the creative economy. NCDCR was the first state organization in the nation to include all agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella.

Through arts efforts led by the N.C. Arts Council, the N.C. Symphony and the N.C. Museum of Art, NCDCR offers the opportunity for enriching arts education for young and old alike and economic stimulus engines for our state’s communities. NCDCR’s Divisions of Archives and Records, State Historic Sites, and State History Museums preserve, document and interpret North Carolina’s rich cultural heritage. NCDCR’s State Library of North Carolina is the principal library of state government and builds the capacity of all libraries in our state, developing and supporting access to traditional and online collections such as genealogy and resources for people who are blind and have physical disabilities.

NCDCR annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported symphony orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives of North Carolina. NCDCR champions our state’s creative industry that accounts for more than 300,000 jobs and generates nearly $18.5 billion in revenues. For more information, please call 919-807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.